8 scientific insights about Life that are well worth learning

Here is a summary of eight insight that are - AT FIRST - surprising, but once you start thinking about it, it becomes obvious why it is so.

  1. Optimistic people are much less likely to die of heart attacks than pessimists, controlling for all known physical risk factors (Giltay et al., 2004).
  2. Women who display genuine (Duchenne) smiles to the photographer at age eighteen go on to have fewer divorces and more marital satisfaction than those who display fake smiles (Keltner et al., 1999).
  3. Positive emotion reduces at least some racial biases. For example, although people generally are better at recognising faces of their own race than faces of other races, putting people in a joyful mood reduces this discrepancy by improving memory for faces of people from other races (Johnson & Fredrickson, 2005).
  4. Externalities (e.g., weather, money, health, marriage, religion) added together account for no more than 15% of the variance in life satisfaction (Diener et al.,1999)
  5. Economically flourishing corporate teams have a ratio of at least 2.9:1 of positive statements to negative statements in business meetings, whereas stagnating teamshave a much lower ratio; flourishing marriages, however, require a ratio of at least 5:1 (Gottman & Levenson, 1999; Fredrickson & Losada, 2005).
  6. Self-discipline is twice as good a predictor of high school grades as IQ (Duckworth & Seligman, 2005).
  7. Happy teenagers go on to earn very substantially more income 15 years later than less happy teenagers, equating for income, grades and other obvious factors (Diener et al., 2002).
  8. How people celebrate good events that happen to their spouse is a better predictor of future love and commitment than how they respond to bad events (Gable et al.,2004).

The nature of the internet is such that we are exposed thousands of potential life-changing insights on any given day. The eight listed here all have that potential, but chances are that all that they get is a cursory glance.

More's a pity...